Configuring IOS DHCP Server







In this Free CCNA Lab we will use Cisco’s Packet Tracer to learn how to configure a DHCP server on a Cisco router. We will create an address pool and exclude certain IP ranges from the pool. We will then configure the DHCP server to assign a network address, default router, and the DNS server address. You will also learn to configure host devices as DHCP clients.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn to create a DHCP address pool on a Cisco router.
  • Learn to exclude IP address from the available address in the pool.
  • Learn how to assign an IP network to an address pool.
  • Learn how to assign a default router address with DHCP.
  • Learn how to assign the DNS server address with DHCP.
  • Learn to configure devices as DHCP clients.

DHCP Overvire:
The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is a network protocol that is used to configure network devices so that they can communicate on an IP network. A DHCP client uses the DHCP protocol to acquire configuration information, such as an IP address, a default route and one or more DNS server addresses from a DHCP server. The DHCP client then uses this information to configure its host. Once the configuration process is complete, the host is able to communicate on the internet.

Tasks:
Some of the devices in this free CCNA lab Packet Tracer activity have already been configured. You will be configuring the three routers and the PC host. The servers and printer have already been assign static IP addresses and will need to be excluded from the DHCP address pool.

Basic Configuration:

  1. Configure the hostname on all routers and switched as shown in the network diagram.
  2. Configure no ip domain-lookup on all routers and switches.
  3. Configure the enable secret password as “cisco” on all routers and switches.
  4. Configure the console and vty password as “sanfran” on all routers and switches.
  5. Configure the exec-timeout command to the console and virtual terminal lines.
  6. Save the running configuration to the NVRAM.

IP Address Configuration:

  1. Configure the IP address, and subnet on the Ethernet interfaces of all routers as shown in network diagram.
  2. Configure the IP address, and subnet on the serials interfaces of all routers as shown in network diagram.
  3. Configure the clock rate on the DCE serial interfaces to be 64K.
  4. Insure the state of the Ethernet and serial interfaces is up.

EIGRP Configuration:

  1. Configure EIGRP on all routers as AS 10.
  2. Configure the 172.16.10.0/24 network on R1 to be part of the EIGRP routing process.
  3. Configure the 10.10.10.0/30 network on R1 to be part of the EIGRP routing process.
  4. Configure the 10.10.10.4/30 network on R1 to be part of the EIGRP routing process.
  5. Configure the 192.168.1.0/24 network on R2 to be part of the EIGRP routing process.
  6. Configure the 10.10.10.0/30 network on R2 to be part of the EIGRP routing process.
  7. Configure the 192.168.2.0/24 network on R3 to be part of the EIGRP routing process.
  8. Configure the 10.10.10.4/30 network on R3 to be part of the EIGRP routing process.

DHCP Configuration:

  1. Exclude the IP address range 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.9 from the DHCP address pool on R2.
  2. Exclude the IP address range 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.254 from the DHCP address pool on R2.
  3. Create a DHCP address pool named “North” on R2.
  4. Assign the IP network 192.168.1.0/24 to the DHCP pool North on R2.
  5. Configure the DHCP pool North to assign the default router address on R2
  6. Configure the DHCP pool North to assign the DNS server address of 172.16.10.200 on R2.
  7. Exclude the IP address range 192.168.2.1 to 192.168.2.9 from the DHCP address pool on R3.
  8. Exclude the IP address range 192.168.2.200 to 192.168.2.254 from the DHCP address pool on R3.
  9. Create a DHCP address pool named “South” on R3.
  10. Assign the IP network 192.168.2.0/24 to the DHCP pool South on R3.
  11. Configure the DHCP pool South to assign the default router address on R3.
  12. Configure the DHCP pool South to assign the DNS server address of 172.16.10.200 on R3.

Verify and Test the Configuration:
On R2 display the DHCP bindings.
R2#sh ip dhcp binding
IP address       Client-ID/              Lease expiration        Type
                 Hardware address
192.168.1.10     0009.7C9D.0424           —                     Automatic
192.168.1.11     00D0.BC52.406E           —                     Automatic

On R2 display the DHCP bindings.
R3#sh ip dhcp binding
IP address       Client-ID/              Lease expiration        Type
                 Hardware address
192.168.2.10     00E0.A30C.ED53           —                     Automatic

Display the IP configuration on PC1.
PC>ipconfig /all

Physical Address…………….: 0009.7C9D.0424
IP Address………………….: 192.168.1.10
Subnet Mask…………………: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway……………..: 192.168.1.1
DNS Servers…………………: 172.16.10.200

Display the IP configuration on PC3.
PC>ipconfig /all

Physical Address…………….: 00E0.A30C.ED53
IP Address………………….: 192.168.2.10
Subnet Mask…………………: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway……………..: 192.168.2.1
DNS Servers…………………: 172.16.10.200

From PC1 ping PC2.
PC>ping 192.168.2.10

Pinging 192.168.2.10 with 32 bytes of data:

Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.2.10: bytes=32 time=159ms TTL=125
Reply from 192.168.2.10: bytes=32 time=172ms TTL=125
Reply from 192.168.2.10: bytes=32 time=172ms TTL=125

Ping statistics for 192.168.2.10:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 3, Lost = 1 (25% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 159ms, Maximum = 172ms, Average = 167ms

From PC1 ping fs1.south.freeccnalab.com.
PC>ping fs1-south.freeccnalab.com

Pinging 192.168.2.200 with 32 bytes of data:

Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.2.200: bytes=32 time=129ms TTL=125
Reply from 192.168.2.200: bytes=32 time=187ms TTL=125
Reply from 192.168.2.200: bytes=32 time=188ms TTL=125

Ping statistics for 192.168.2.200:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 3, Lost = 1 (25% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 129ms, Maximum = 188ms, Average = 168ms

This concludes this Free CCNA Lab Packet Tracer activity.

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